Common Misconceptions about Bidets and why you should consider getting one

Misinformation is a term we’re all familiar with these days. Luckily, some misinformation is easy to clear up – like that about bidets. If you’re like most Americans, you have misinformation about bidets. So, let’s go over the top misconceptions about bidets, and why you should consider getting a bidet today.

Common Misconceptions about Bidets and why you should consider getting one
Source

Misconception 1: Bidets are complicated to use which is why only French people use them. 

Okay, first of all, the United States is one of the only civilized countries where bidets aren’t widely in use. From Africa to Europe to Asia, people all use bidets. In Japan, you can even find bidets in public restrooms. 

As for the complication of using a bidet, is sitting on your rear and pressing a button located at your fingertips hard? We didn’t think so. Modern bidets, like the Bio Bidet BB 2000 Bliss,  fit on your regular toilet. All you do is remove your old toilet seat and replace it with a bidet seat. The only difference is, you need to plug in your bidet seat, so you’ll need an outlet. 

Past that, you sit on the seat like normal when you use the bathroom, and when you’re done, you press a button – either on a remote control, or somewhere on the bidet (it all depends on how high-tech and fancy your bidet model is), and then a nozzle appears that sprays a stream of water at you to clean your sensitive areas. 

When you’re done washing, the novel retracts – and in some cases self-sanitizes. If you have a warm-air dryer on your bidet, you can press a button to dry yourself, or you can use a tiny amount of toilet paper to pat yourself dry. Then you flush, and voila, you just used a bidet.

Misconception 2: Bidets aren’t sanitary.

Some people think bidet nozzles will be covered in fecal matter after a wash, and therefore will be unsanitary for future washes. This is incorrect. Bidet makers intentionally position the nozzles at angles that will ensure fecal matter falls into the toilet not on the nozzle. But if nozzle-cleanliness is still a top concern to you, you can always invest in a bidet that has a self-sanitizing nozzle system. 

Many women worry the nozzle will spray fecal matter into their private parts. Again, the nozzles are not positioned at an angle to do that. We know it can be hard to visualize, so try watching some videos online of how bidet nozzles work. You will see that the nozzles have been positioned and designed to hygienically clean you, whether you’re a man or a woman, in a way that is superior to toilet paper wiping. 

With a bidet, you can’t accidentally wipe from back to front. Bidets like that Brondell Swash 1400 are made so that your hand will never accidentally come in contact with your waste. Washing is better than wiping, plain and simple. If you spilled sticky soda on your arm, would you dab it with dry paper and leave it be? Similarly, your sensitive areas will be better off with a warm water wash than with dry paper.

Misconception 3: Bidets aren’t comfortable. 

Modern bidets offer many incredible features – from heated toilet seats to variable pressure washes to variable types of wash (front, posterior, enema, and more). Because you have so much control over the wash, you’ll find using a bidet so comfortable and so soothing, that you’ll wonder why you didn’t switch years ago. They’re like warm showers for your sensitive areas. 

We hope we’ve helped clear up the top misinformation about bidets. And if you’re ready to take the plunge, check out our 30-day risk-free trial offer on bidetsplus.com today! 


Author Bio:

Jensen Lee is the Founder and Managing Member of bidetsPLUS, an online retail store specializing in bidet toilet seats. Prior to bidetsPLUS, Jensen held management positions in technology-related fields, in both the U.S. and Europe. He has held the position of Product Manager of Global Network Services for British Telecom. Most recently, he held the position of Executive Director of Product Marketing at AT&T Interactive, AT&T’s internet advertising division.